Explore the latest research being conducted by members of the Maryland Statewide Epidemiological Outcomes Workgroup (SEOW).

Fast Facts on Drug and Alcohol Use in Maryland

In recognition of National Drug and Alcohol Awareness Week (January 25-31, 2016), the Behavioral Health Administration and the Maryland Statewide Epidemiological Outcomes Workgroup (SEOW) have partnered to share the following fast facts about drug and alcohol use in Maryland. Click on each link to learn more about the factoid shown.

  • Fast Fact 1‌: In 2013, more Maryland teenagers reported alcohol use than the national average.
  • Fast Fact 2‌: Prescription stimulants (e.g., Ritalin, Adderall, Vyvanse) are widely used by Marylanders.
  • Fast Fact 3‌: In 2014, Marylanders made 42,151 hospital or emergency room visits that involved prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, or heroin.
  • Fast Fact 4‌: In 2013, the percentage of young adults using marijuana surpassed their risk perception of marijuana use.
  • Fast Fact 5‌: Mental illness and substance use disorders often occur together.
  • Fast Fact 6‌: Thirteen out of 100 hospital and emergency department visits by adults aged 65 years and older involve prescription opioids or heroin.
  • Fast Fact 7‌: Maryland drug overdose mortality rates exceed the national average.
  • Fast Fact 8‌: Alcohol, heroin, and marijuana are the top three most commonly used substances by Marylanders admitted to substance use treatment programs.
Co-occurring Mental Health Problems in Treatment Admissions for Substance Use Disorders in Maryland

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Co-occurring Mental Health Problems in Treatment Admissions for Substance Use Disorders in Maryland

Patience Moyo, graduate student in the PhD in PHSR Program and graduate research assistant with the Maryland SEOW, presented findings on co-occurring mental and substance use disorders at the 2014 Addiction Health Services Research conference in Boston, MA. Treatment admissions data for fiscal years 2008–2013 from the State of Maryland Automated Record Tracking (SMART) system served as the data source. Results showed an increase in the percentage of substance use treatment admissions -- overall and substance-specific -- involving a co-existing mental health problem. The prevalence of co-occurring mental health problems varied geographically by both county of client residence and location of the treatment facility. The presentation abstract is available in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, 2015, 10(Suppl 1): A42.

Co-occurring Mental Illness in Emergency Department and Hospital Inpatient Encounters Related to Substance Abuse in Maryland

Ting-Ying Jane Huang, a graduate research assistant in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research and the Maryland SEOW, presented her findings on co-occurring mental illness in substance abuse-related hospital encounters at the 2014 Addiction Health Services Research conference in Boston, MA. This study identified increasing co-occurring trends in substance abuse and mental illness in Maryland from 2008 to 2012. Findings suggested younger and non-white individuals were more likely to have substance abuse-related emergency department encounters than inpatient encounters. The presentation abstract is published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, 2015, 10(Suppl 1): A22.

Where You Live and Who You Are Matter: Prescription Opioid Treatment Admissions (Updated Data and Analysis)

Ting-Ying Jane Huang, a graduate student in the Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) PhD Program and a graduate research assistant with the Maryland SEOW, presented her findings on prescription opioid treatment admissions at the 2014 AcademyHealth conference held in San Diego, CA. This presentation improved the Maryland SEOW's previous work using updated data and multivariable analysis.

Estimates and Characteristics of Emergency Department Visits Involving Prescription Opioid Analgesics in the United States: 2007-2011

Patience Moyo, a graduate student in the Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) PhD Program and a graduate research assistant with the Maryland SEOW, presented her findings on national estimates of emergency department visits involving prescription pain relievers at the International Conference on Opioids held in Boston, MA on June 9, 2014.

Marijuana Use in Maryland

Ting-Ying Jane Huang, a graduate student in the Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) PhD Program, presented the latest estimates for marijuana use in Maryland at the 2013 Esri's Mid-Atlantic User Conference held in Baltimore. Using data from the 2008-2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this interactive map portrays sub-state estimates of prevalence of marijuana use, including past-month use, past-year use, and first use, as well as risk perceptions of marijuana. Detailed prevalence estimates by age groups are provided in pop-ups by clicking on each sub-state regions.

Where You Live and Who You Are Matter: Prescription Opioid Treatment Admissions

Ting-Ying Jane Huang, a graduate student in the Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) Graduate Program, received the 2013 Communication Award at the Esri Health GIS Conference in Cambridge, MA. The award is conferred annually in recognition of the best demonstration of the art of communicating geographic information.

Opioid-Related Hospital Admissions and Deaths in Maryland (2008-2011)

Patience Moyo, a graduate research assistant with the Maryland SEOW, presented her findings on opioid-related hospital admissions and deaths in Maryland from 2008-2011 at the AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting on June 24, 2013.

Designer Drugs, Pain-Killers, Marijuana, and Alcohol: A Snapshot of Use, Treatment, and Consequences in Maryland

Dr. Simoni-Wastila and members of the SEOW team presented current trends in drug and alcohol use, treatment, and consequences to the Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework Advisory Council (MSPF) on January 31, 2013. These results will help the MSPF determine next steps in prevention, treatment, and recovery for Maryland citizens at risk for or suffering from substance use disorders.

Marijuana use among Maryland Young Adults